Posts Tagged: web

Four quick CSS tips from CSSConf 2015

Lea Verou at CSSConf
Lea Verou presenting at CSSConf 2015

I recently attended the third annual CSSConf here in NYC. The conference scheduled sixteen speakers over two days with varied content and subject matter. Some speakers talked about the gap between design and development. Others touched on coworker relationships and styling for the web’s future, “post CSS”. Most focused on CSS-based web development. Here are a few takeaways that are easy for almost anyone to integrate into their workflow.

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The billionaire’s typewritter

Practical Typography’s Matthew Butterick on Medium and other similar writing platforms:

We can’t say that Medium et al. are offering minimalist design. Only the veneer is minimalist. What they’re re ally offering is a shift from design as a choice to de sign as a constant. Instead of minimalist design, a better term might be homogeneous design.

Matthew is clearly anti-Medium with his stance here, and he goes onto attack many fronts; lack of typographic customization is just the beginning. Pro or con Medium as a publishing platform for the future, it’s nevertheless an excellent read.

Instant web

Mark Llobrera, writing on a wonderful post regarding Facebook’s Instant Articles and web performance over at A List Apart:

For most of us, even the ones I would describe as pro-performance, everything in the contemporary web design production pipeline works against the very focus required to keep the web fast. Unless you make some fundamental choices and set up clear constraints, you can—and will—build and ship beautiful sites without feeling a single ounce of the pain and frustration that your users encounter when all of that beautiful imagery, CSS, and JavaScript comes trickling down their mobile network.

Death to typewriters

From Medium, a one stop shop for everything about writing high quality text for the web. Everything from custom underlines to print styles, it’s all here. For web developers/designers, the best part is a technical supplement that outlines a lot of the CSS Medium uses to achieve its typography and layout.

Sharing in the world of the in-app web view

Interesting piece from Alastair Coote on how to determine if a user is accessing your web property via either full browser or in-app web view. It effectively is a user agent string check, which by it’s nature means you’re not batting 100% accuracy, but it’s a cool idea nevertheless.

The widescreen web: using CSS object-fit

Object-fit is a CSS attribute that should have had widespread support a long time ago; super useful. It’s a bummer that Microsoft still lists the object-fit parameter as merely “Under Consideration”, but falling back for IE is easy and safe.

Electron

Wonderful to see the technology behind Slack’s Mac app get such a slick site and documentation from Github. Can’t wait to dive into this for side project work.

How we make RWD sites load fast as heck

Essential reading by the Filament group on how to speed up the “critical path” of your web site’s load performance. The post includes coverage of asynchronous JavaScript loading and inlining critical CSS.

Flexbox adventures

Excellent explanation of how the Flexbox CSS operator determines layout. I especially enjoy how the author breaks down the math calculations and proportion.

A vision for our Sass

Felicity Evans writes a “manifesto” for well written Sass in A List Apart:

Yet alongside the wide-scale adoption of Sass (which I applaud), I’ve observed a steady decline in the quality of outputted CSS (which I bemoan). It makes sense: Sass introduces a layer of abstraction between the author and the stylesheets. But we need a way to translate the web standards—that we fought so hard for—into this new environment. The problem is, the Sass specification is expanding so much that any set of standards would require constant revision. Instead, what we need is a charter—one that sits outside Sass, yet informs the way we code.